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Ruth Wallis
(? - living) U.S.A.

Ruth Wallis

Singer

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An accomplished singer and piano player since the 1940's, Ruth started a recording career with songs like Freddy The Fisherman's Son and The New Yo-Yo Song. By 1949, she had recorded her trademark tune, The Dinghy Song. The song told of Davey, a man with "the cutest little dinghy in the Navy," and it sold a quarter of a million copies. Wallis later brought Davey back for a pair of sequel songs - The Admiral's Daughter and The Hawaiian Lei Song.

Unlike many other party records, which barely could afford more than a singer and a piano, Ruth Wallis' songs had full orchestras, usually under the direction of Mac Ceppos or Jimmy Carroll. In America, Ruth Wallis' records were a naughty collectible. Overseas, they were a sensation. Her albums became huge sellers in London and Toronto, in Hong Kong and in Sydney, in Auckland and in Paris. An appreciative producer flew her to London just so he could produce an album for her. Two tracks on this CD, Marriage Jewish Style and Boobs come from that recording session and are Ruth's first songs in true stereo.

Ruth Wallis' songs weren't filthy or dirty. They were, however, wry observances of things that suburban America wasn't ready to discuss - things like cross-dressing (He'd Rather Be A Girl, or Queer Things), infidelity (The Pistol Song, Drill 'em All), the reunion of wife and soldier (The Army Gave My Husband Back To Me), and the looser morals of foreign countries (Follies Bergere, The Bells Song). And if you still don't understand what "double entendre" means - tell me what you think "pops-up" in The Pop-Up Song before and after you hear it.

Lately, Ruth Wallis records have been rediscovered by a new audience. Tunes like The Dinghy Song have become staples on the Dr. Demento radio show. And even at a time when most musicians her age would have retired, Ruth is still writing songs, this time for a series of musicals.

Ruth Wallis
He'd rather be a Girl (from "Hot Songs for Cool Knights", 1958)

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Source: from an article by Chuck Miller, Goldmine Magazine at http://artists.iuma.com/IUMA/Bands/Wallis,_Ruth/

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