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May 6th
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corner Homoerotic Poems - Avni (30 March 1432 - 3 May 1481) - Sultan Mehmed II of Turkey corner
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Dedicated to a christian youth

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Nobody would think of the river of paradise
after drinking the pure wine that he the Christian drank;
Nobody would go a mosque
after seeing the church where he went;
O Avni, anybody would know that he was a Frankish beauty,
After seeing the girdle around his waist
and the crucifix around his neck.

From: Halil Edhem Eldem, Ottoman Empire and It's Heritage, 1999, pag 150

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I saw an angel...

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I saw an angel, a sun face
or this world's moon
Black hyacinth curls,
smoky sighs of lovers
An alluring cypress
clad in black, like the moon
in night of Franks
whom his beauty rules
If your heart is not bound
in the knot of heathen belt,
You're no true believer,
but a lost soul among lovers
His lips give life anew
to those whom his glances kill
Just so, for that giver of life
follows the way of Jesus
Avni have no doubt,
that beauty will one day be tame
For you are ruler of Istanbul
and he the lord of Galata.

From: "The Age of Beloveds: Love and the Beloved in Early-Modern Ottoman and European Culture and Society" Walter G. Andrews, Mehmet Kalpakli

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When the rosebush...

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When the rosebush in the garden dons its coat
it fashions teh buttons from rosebuds
When in speech the tongue weaves roses and buds together
Its words are as nothing compared to his sweet lips.
When you stroll through the garden wit ha hundred coy deceits
The jasmine branches are so amazed at the sight that they sway with you
When the dogwood sees the roses strewn in your path
Then it strews its petals before you
Until that rose cheeked beauty comes to see the garden,
O Avni, may the ground be always damp with the tears of your eyes!

From: "The Age of Beloveds: Love and the Beloved in Early-Modern Ottoman and European Culture and Society" Walter G. Andrews, Mehmet Kalpakli

Some translators interpreted the object of love of sultan as female, putting "her" instead of "him/his". However Ottoman poetry is androgynous. The Turkish language (like Persian) does not reveal gender, but in the basis of Sufi love the ideal beauty is reflected in the beauty of a man or a boy. So it is the known fact that in many poems of the Sultan the loved one is a male.

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With such beauty...

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With such beauty among the lovers, Veyis is most loved
Sherbet of his ruby lips is the cure for a suffering heart
Don't cry my dear nightingale, henceforth I cry for help...
For Veyis,beautiful like a rose, has opened in the garden of my heart
And the heart of a country with justice will flourish
Through all these years,who was on the throne of the sultan's heart,but Veyis Tears in the eyes like wine, inside the chest are burnt
Oh crazy heart,because the whole night, Veyis is a guest
To Avni,If the fortune was in his hands, it was a beloved guest
Do not waste this opportunity, for Veyis is worth a thousand lovers

The name Üveys or Veyis is an Arab male name. It is frequently used in classical Turkish literature to symbolically denote the loved one

Translation by © Elveo

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Ghazal (lyric poetry) no.2:

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If my eyes shed tears of my heart's pain about you,
Then my secret concealed would be obvious to you
You sit on the throne of beauty, while I stand on the soil of the road.
How should I help myself, an ant, while you are my Süleyman?
See him, the candle who is weeping at the gathering,
Oh, you are the beautiful candle who illuminates my room!
When the morning comes I am faithful, but love-stricken
When the day will end, oh you, my shining crescent!
Yesterday my rivals cried out their pain with grief,
The pursuers of love have suffered the misfortunes you had inflicted upon me.
My friend, it isn't possible to explain the wound of heart's pain,
That burning flash in my chest will show it to you.
Stop ruining Avni's eyes and heart with your torture,
Because the pit of my sea can give pearls and jewels to you.

Translated from ottoman Turkish by © Elveo

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Souls are fluttered...

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Souls are fluttered when the morning breezes through thy tresses stray;
Waving cypresses are wildered when thy motions they survey.
Since with witchcraft thou hast whetted keen the lancet of thy glance,
All my veins are bleeding inward through my longing and dismay.
"Why across thy cheek disordered float thy tresses?" asked I him.
"It is Rüm-Eyli; there high-starred heroes gallop," did he say,
Thought I, though I spake not; "In thy quarter, through thy tint and scent.
Wretched and head-giddy, wandering, those who hope not for stray.
"Whence the anger in thy glances, O sweet love ? " I said ; then he:
" Silence! surely if I shed blood, I the ensigns should display."
Even as thou sighest, 'Avni, shower thine eyes tears fast as rain.
Like as follow hard the thunder-roll the floods in dread array.

Originally, Rumelia (Rum Eyli) was only implied by the word Rum (Rome, or the Roman Bysantine Empire), but in course of time it was employed to designate the whole Turkish empire.

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Ruba'i

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Cupbearer,
bring, bring here again
my yester even's wine;
My harp and rebec bring,
hem bid address
this heart of mine:
While still I live,
'tis meet that I should mirth and glee enjoy;
The day shall come
when none may e'en
my resting-place divine.

From: http://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/source/turkishpoetry1.html

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The roses of your cheeks...

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The roses of your cheeks, they made my tongue a nightingale.
The locks on your forehead, they made me desire, lose my mind.

If the fruit of love is for lovers, the worry and grief,
Thank God, they have many for us, the fruits of your love.

The breeze is powerless to untangle the ends of your locks.
No, it is not easy to resolve the difficulties at all!

What is the relationship came between us, as the nectar from the lips of the beloved,
This poison of grief is halva for me, but for the rival, the poison of assassins?

How many enlightened men became insane by your love!
How many sensible men have gone mad with desire for you!

To what good is the saying: "Let the arrows of his eyelashes murder you!"?
They are brave inexperienced people who hold such remarks.

O Avni! If one day you were on a pilgrimage to the temple of the Magi
You would have seen the lights of the wine candles illuminating the company! (...)

Translation by © Elveo

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Mehmed II the conqueror (30 March 1432 – 3 May 1481), who supposedly was pan-sexual because besides having 4 wives he had sex with men and eunuchs, was the sultan of Turkey. He was a poet by the name of Avni (the helper, the helpful one) and wrote about love of boys

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