Last update:
April 12th
2001

livingroom Shakespeare

corner Shakespeare Sonnets to Willie Hughes - Page 21 corner
bottom

logo

top

bottom

logo

top

bottom

logo

top

bottom

logo

top

decorative bar

Sonnet 121

spacer

'Tis better to be vile than vile esteemed
When not to be receives reproach of being,
And the just pleasure lost, which is so deemed
Not by our feeling, but by others' seeing.
For why should others' false adulterate eyes
Give salutation to my sportive blood?
Or on my frailties why are frailer spies,
Which in their wills count bad what I think good?
No, I am that I am, and they that level
At my abuses reckon up their own.
I may be straight, though they themselves be bevel,
By their rank thoughts my deeds must not be shown,
          Unless this general evil they maintain,
          All men are bad and in their badness reign.

Shakespeare here reverses the apparent renunciation of pleasure in Sonnet 20, and quite explicitly argues with Willie to grant him this pleasure. He seems to be saying, "You may as well sleep with me, since others already think we are queer anyway" (or to put in contemporary Renaissance words, "If I am going to be called a sodomite I may as well enjoy the delights of sodomy".)

The tremors of Shakespeare's sportive blood - which of course means sexual excitement - were revealed most clearly in sonnets 50 and 51.

bar

Sonnet 122

spacer

Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain
Full charactered with lasting memory,
Which shall above that idle rank remain
Beyond all date, even to eternity.
Or, at the least, so long as brain and heart
Have faculty by nature to subsist,
Till each to razed oblivion yield his part
Of thee, thy record never can be missed.
That poor retention could not so much hold,
Nor need I tallies thy dear love to score.
Therefore to give them from me was I bold,
To trust those tables that receive thee more.
          To keep an adjunct to remember thee
          Were to import forgetfulness in me.

bar

Sonnet 123

spacer

No, Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change.
Thy pyramids built up with newer might
To me are nothing novel, nothing strange,
They are but dressings of a former sight.
Our dates are brief, and therefore we admire
What thou dost foist upon us that is old,
And rather make them born to our desire
Than think that we before have heard them told.
Thy registers and thee I both defy,
Not wondering at the present nor the past,
For thy recórds and what we see doth lie,
Made more or less by thy continual haste.
          This I do vow, and this shall ever be,
          I will be true, despite thy scythe and thee.

bar

Sonnet 124

spacer

If my dear love were but the child of state,
It might for Fortune's bastard be unfathered,
As subject to Time's love or to Time's hate,
Weeds among weeds or flowers with flowers gathered.
No, it was builded far from accident,
It suffers not in smiling pomp, nor falls
Under the blow of thralléd discontent,
Whereto the inviting time our fashion calls.
It fears not policy, that heretic,
Which works on leases of short-numbered hours,
But all alone stands hugely politic,
That it nor grows with heat nor drowns with showers.
          To this I witness call the fools of time,
          Which die for goodness, who have lived for crime.

bar

Sonnet 125

spacer

Were't aught to me I bore the canopy,
With my extern the outward honoring,
Or laid great bases for eternity,
Which prove more short than waste or ruining?
Have I not seen dwellers on form and favor
Lose all, and more, by paying too much rent,
For compound sweet forgoing simple savor,
Pitiful thrivers, in their gazing spent?
No, let me be obsequious in thy heart,
And take thou my oblation, poor but free,
Which is not mixed with seconds, knows no art
But mutual render, only me for thee.
          Hence,thou suborned informer! A true soul
          When most impeached stands least in thy control.

bar

Sonnet 126

spacer

O thou, my lovely boy, who in thy power
Dost hold Time's fickle glass, his sickle hour,
Who hast by waning grown, and therein show'st
Thy lovers withering as thy sweet self grow'st,
If Nature, sovereign mistress over wrack,
As thou goest onwards, still will pluck thee back,
She keeps thee to this purpose, that her skill
May time disgrace, and wretched minutes kill.
Yet fear her, O thou minion of her pleasure!
She may detain, but not still keep, her treasure.
          Her audit, though delayed, answered must be,
          And her quietus is to render thee.

bar

backindexnext

decorative bar


corner © Matt & Andrej Koymasky, 1997 - 2003 corner
navigation map
recommend
corner
corner
If you can't use the map, use these links
HALL Lounge Living Room Memorial
Our Bedroom Guests Room Library Workshop
Links Awards Web Rings Map
corner
corner